The Complete Guide to Marking All the Must-Haves on Ready-to-Eat Bags

Introduction: What Should Be Marked on a Ready-to-Eat Bag?

The regulation is divided into eight main parts. These eight parts are described in an easy-to-understand, step-by-step format and are illustrated below in the infographic.
Part 1
-Label to show the name and address of the manufacturer or packer in Canada
Part 2
-Ingredients list with an indication which ingredients are allergens or ingredients that present a high risk of foodborne illness (hazardous foods)
Part 3 -Name and address of distributor in Canada if different from Part 1. Listing Canadian distributors on packs provides clarity for consumers about where product was produced for sale in Canada.
Part 4

what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs
what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs

Biggies – What Foods Should Be Labeled?

The foods that are required to be labeled are listed in Section 102 of the regulation: meat, poultry, seafood and other foods that are intended for human consumption (commonly known as “meats”). The main purpose of the regulation is to make sure that food is safe to eat, so the regulation specifically states: “The food shall be wholesome and fit for human consumption, and truthfully and accurately labeled…
Foods commonly known as “meats” are the most common food that is mislabeled or mishandled in stores and restaurants. People who purchase meats at the grocery store or order meats at a restaurant can help keep the public safe by understanding what foods should be labeled, and what foods are exempt.
What Foods Should Be Labeled?

what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs
what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs

What Are the Fats and Oils that Must Be Labeled?

The fats and oils are also regulated in Section 102 of the regulation. The fats and/or oils that must be labeled are: vegetable oil, shortening, edible oil, butterfat, margarine, ghee, lard, and other fat or oil derived from a food source. This list is not all-inclusive, as there are many other fats and oils that should be labeled. For example, interesterified vegetable oil, hydrogenated oils and hydrogenated shortening, palm oil, and palm kernel oil are fats or oils derived from a food source that must be labeled. At this time the USDA has not established a definition for these terms: marine oils, vegetable shortenings that contain saturated fat derived from plant sources (such as cocoa butter), and mono- or di-glycerides. [1]

what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs
what must be marked on ready-to-eat bags phfs