The Ultimate Guide to North Carolina’s Scorpions

Scorpions are not native to North Carolina. However, some have been transplanted here. They would have to have a means of reproduction, which they do. Many scientists believe that they are imported along with other arthropod pests.
The name “scorpion” is derived from Latin’scorpion, which means thief. This is thought to be so because of the way their pincers or claws move.
There are approximately 2,000 species of scorpions with most being located in warmer climates. There are only about 15 species found in North Carolina and those tend to live in the western part of the state. In North Carolina, scorpions are not often considered as pests and will only sting if agitated beyond reason.
In the United States, scorpions come from a variety of places. They are usually introduced species, meaning that they have not been naturally occurring in the area. In general, scorpions that come here were either imported or were intentionally released by a private land owner.

are there scorpions in north carolina
are there scorpions in north carolina

North Carolina is known for its natural beauty. What most people do not know is that the Tar Heel State has a hidden danger in its soil that could be lethal: scorpions. In fact, of all the states in the US, North Carolina has by far the highest number of scorpion species. Are you scared yet? But now there’s good news – no need to worry! Just following these simple guidelines can help anyone make it through any night in North Carolinas with their sanity intact and their valuables still on their person.

First, as with most creatures in North Carolina, it is better to avoid scorpions than to try to confront them. It is rare to find a healthy specimen away from its burrow, and most likely the scorpion won’t be where you’re at. But if you do encounter one of these creatures, there are ways of dealing with it. As a general rule, North Carolina’s scorpions are not dangerous to humans. Unlike their venomous counterparts, most scorpions in North Carolina will sting if provoked, but only with their pincers and tails. Their sting is more akin to a bee than to a rattlesnake and is generally harmless to humans (except for children under the age of three). If stung, avoid scratching or rubbing the area and seek medical attention immediately.
If you have to confront the scorpion, it may be best to have some kind of shield or container available. You can capture the scorpion by placing the container over it and snatching up the outside of the jar with a cloth or paper and carrying it away. If this is not possible, you can safely pick up a scorpion using forceps or tweezers (wear thick gloves). You can also gently hold the scorpion as you crush it with a large flat object such as a sheet of metal.

are there scorpions in north carolina
are there scorpions in north carolina

The most common species of scorpion in North Carolina is the Central American Bark Scorpion. Its coloring resembles that of a small tree or wood. They hang from their burrow at night and are rarely seen unless disturbed. “They are harmless, but if you see one, they will likely sting.” says Aaron Scott of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. “They tend to stay away from humans and are not considered poisonous.”
The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has more information on the Bark Scorpion.
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Mark Twain lived in North Carolina, and he was a fan of the state.
“Babies born in North Carolina have been named Mark Twain and North Carolina,” said Dr. Sue Ruckdeschel, an obstetrician at Duke University who helped lead the study in 2004. The babies were born to women who breathed into a plastic bag filled with helium as part of an experiment in fetal development. “The babies had quite an affinity for airplanes, too,” she said. “They liked to ride in airplanes.”
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Unlike the well-known rattlesnake that’s indigenous to North Carolina, the timber rattlesnake is actually rare in the state. “This snake is classified as vulnerable due to its declining populations and limited distribution,” according to a 2015 study co-authored by North Carolina State University (NCSU) biologist Chontrell Carter, who was not involved with the current research. “We do not have any historical records of the timber rattlesnake in North Carolina before about 100 years ago,” Carter said. “While timber rattlesnakes are now found in most southern states, they are found only in scattered locations in North Carolina.” [source]
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are there scorpions in north carolina
are there scorpions in north carolina

Keywords: are there scorpions in north carolina, north carolina scorpion species, are there dangerous scorpions in north carolina

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Are there scorpions in North Carolina? Yes, there are! They are most commonly found in the southern region. Your best defense is to identify various species and avoid them accordingly. If you suspect that a scorpion has stung you, watch for the following signs:
• If it’s a black widow, look for cramping or spasms in your abdomen, sensations of tingling or numbness moving up your body from the affected area. You may also see swelling at the site of the sting.
• If it’s a brown recluse, watch for signs of concern and seek medical attention immediately. You may notice a crusted area around the sting, along with a raised, red mark.

are there scorpions in north carolina
are there scorpions in north carolina